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C. THOMAS

Essay 2 Sketch

Once upon a time[DP1] [DP2] …

            There was an Emperor from a far away land who ruled his people with excessive arrogance and opulence, never passing up an opportunity to display his stature to his subjects. Coming from a long line of Emperors before him, it was all he knew; the Emperor was the highest, most heralded figure in all the land, just as his great, great grandfather was even all those years ago during the Nineteen Years’ Skirmish of Shirdenhiregarten.

            The Emperor seamlessly followed in the footsteps (ahem, ruby-clad sandals) of his forefathers. Not only was such a life outlook all he knew, but the castle in which his family ensconced itself throughout the centuries was festooned with their paintings and tomes of their personal accords, opinions, and advice. The family crest was emblazoned on The Emperor’s flowing robes, bath robes, and even . He recited the family credo every morning when he awoke, before every address to the public (which were far and few between, mind you), as well as every evening before feasting on olived leg of leopard, the Emperor’s favorite meal and a recipe passed down from generation to generation. The motto (the non-abridged form was rumored to be over 235 scrolls long) went a little something like this:

E for excellence and emeralds,

M for his majesty.

P for power, o preponderant power

E once again for good measure, for eternal everlasting.

R for resplendent reverence

O for ostentatious opulence

R for refulgence

That is the way the Emperor lives, that is the way the Emperor is.

            The Emperor would never dare venture out of the example set by his past elders. He took from them his temperament, outlooks, and politics. If the Emperor’s monarchy was not just that and actually featured “parties,” as they are called hypothetically called by philosophers, it can be reasonably surmised that he would have adopted such identifications transmitted [DP3] by his family, too.

            Ruling his kingdom as any other Emperor would, telling this peasant he cannot dig a well there and that peon she cannot trade her rhubarbs with neighboring provinces, and signing this decree and that while polishing his sapphire scepter with his unicorn hair silk handkerchief, nothing really ever crossed his mind. He was an Emperor, from a valorous line of Emperors before him, whose job it was to rule. Why should he think more deeply into it? As a mere scribe I dare not journey into such blasphemous territory; yet, for the sake of this tale, the question has relevance.

            During the biweekly Emperor Extravaganza day, laborers of the kingdom were granted the evening off to gather at the town square in admiration of the Emperor. The Emperor, his chin nearly touching his nose as it protruded past the highest turret of the castle, paraded past on his lavish float as the people were required to gently toss flowers at his procession. It was a great surprise indeed when the lions pulling his chassis stopped suddenly: a small boy had wandered out of the masses, curiously staring at the Emperor. Shifting his crown back atop his holy head after being discombobulated from the sudden brake, the Emperor looked down upon the small subject between squinted beady eyes, nostrils flaring.

“Guards! Please remove this hindrance from my sight at once,” he bellowed.

As the royal guards approached the little boy, he tossed up into the air the small, tattered kite he was holding in his dirty, calloused palm. A lazy breeze caught the kite, and it gingerly floated down into the Emperor’s lap.

“Would you like to go down to the glen and fly kites with me?” the small child inquired.

The Emperor, visibly dumbstruck by such an inquiry, retorted, “No, I would most certainly not.”

“Why not?” the little boy asked politely. “Don’t you like flying kites? It’s a perfect kite-flying day out.”

Staring into the little boy’s bright blue eyes and kind face, the Emperor started to stammer, struggling to articulate why it was he couldn’t play with the boy.

“My father and I are going fishing later too, would you like to come along? I heard there’s a giant purple platypus in the lake. I’m gonna catch him[DP4] .”

The eyes of the kingdom were upon the Emperor. They all knew quite well what was unfolding before him. No one had ever had the gall to emerge from the masses and question his position over them. The little boy was unaware of such implications.

A great debate was unfolding in the Emperor’s head. He could not figure out how to explain to the boy that he ruled him and his family and friends. It was his job to tell the boy’s family what to do, when to do it, and how to do it, just as his family had done for generations. If the Emperor started flying kites with peasants, how in the world would they still respect him? Why am I even contemplating flying kites at all? The emperor thought. There is no kite flying for Emperors. However the thought would not leave him.”

“Because…it’s just how things work- there is no such time for…it is my job to-” The emperor stopped suddenly.

“You know what, I’d love to fly kites with you today on this most glorious autumn afternoon,” the Emperor declared, sending the crowd into celebration. The Emperor hopped down off his caravan without the assistance of his servants, picked up the boy in his arms and placed his crown upon the boy’s head, which sat upon his shoulders.

            Truly ‘twas a historic day in the kingdom. The centuries old practices of the Emperors were finally reexamined. It took the naivety of a small curious boy to inform the Emperor that other viewpoints are out there. Now if you will please forgive me, I desperately want to drop my quill and join the rest of the town down in the meadow[DP5] .

Bibliography

Andersen, Hans Christian; Tatar, Maria (Ed. and transl.); Allen, Julie K. (Transl.) (2008). The Annotated Hans Christian Andersen. New York and London: W. W. Norton & Company, Inc.

            The short story “The Emperor’s New Clothes” is the fiction piece I am structuring my project off of.

Baldacci, D. (2007). Simple genius. New York: Warner Books.

Brewer, M. D., Stonecash, J. M. Dynamics of American political parties. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009. Print.

Converse, Philip E. The Dynamics of Party Support. Vol. 35. Beverly Hills: Sage Publications, 1976. Print.

 

Greenberg, Edward S. Political Socialization. New York: Atherton Press, 1970. Print.

 

Hess, Robert D., and Judith V. Torney. The Development of Political Attitudes in Children. Chicago: Aldine Publishing Company, 1967. Print.

 

Hyman, Herbert H. Political Socialization: A Study in the Psychology of Political Behavior. Glencoe: The Free Press, 1959. Print.

 

Hyman’s piece, along with that of Converse, serve as the major foundations for the main argument of this essay, which I am creatively repurposing.

 

Langton, Kenneth P. Political Socialization. New York: Oxford University Press, 1969. Print.

 

Peterson, Steven A. Political Behavior: Patterns in Everyday Life. Newbury Park: Sage Publications, 1990. Print.

Plato., Grube, G. M. A. The Republic. Indianapolis: Hackett Pub. Co., 1974. Print.

Schwartz, David C., and Sandra K. Schwartz. New Directions in Political Socialization. New York: The Free Press, 1975. Print.

 


 [DP1]I checked out Baldacci’s “Simple Genius” from the library, and am going to try to replicate his tactics for addressing his audience as well as the fairy tale’s. His novel will be useful when I construct my précis for my annotated bibliography. Also, still unclear about the difference between venue and genre, in terms of précis writing.

 [DP2]I decided to heed my peer group’s advice and pursue a fairy tale genre instead of a short story, although I still incorporate the creativity and story-telling tone I would have used there. I am drawing off of “The Emperor’s New Clothes” as inspiration.

 [DP3]As per Converse and Hyman, most people’s political preferences originate from parental influence. The tale centers around the Emperor’s realization that he can be influenced by others too; the long-standing belief system he was indoctrinated with can be altered by the people he encounters.

 [DP4]I plan to expand this dialogue, lacing it with more references to the authors of my original political science paper.

 [DP5]A problem I foresee with this project is length. Although this is just a sketch, I am unsure how I will add a lot more.

Christopher J. Thomas

22 February 2012

Writing 200

Project 2 Draft 2

 

Once upon a time…

            There was an Emperor from a far away land who ruled his people with excessive arrogance and opulence, never passing up an opportunity to display his superior stature to his subjects. Coming from a long line of Emperors before him, it was all he knew; the Emperor was the highest, most heralded figure in all the land, just as his great, great grandfather was even all those years ago during the Nineteen Years’ Skirmish of South Shirdenhiregarten.

            The Emperor seamlessly followed in the footsteps (ahem, ruby-clad slippers) of his forefathers. Not only was such a life outlook all he knew, but the castle in which his family ensconced itself throughout the centuries was festooned with their paintings and tomes of their personal accords, opinions, and advice. The family crest was emblazoned on everything The Emperor owned from his flowing robes and bath robes even to the suede case that contained the golden toe nail clipper with which his servants groomed him every Wednesday. He recited the family credo every morning when he awoke, before every address to the public (which were far and few between, mind you), as well as every evening before feasting on olived leg of leopard, The Emperor’s favorite meal and a recipe passed down from generation to generation. The motto (the non-abridged scrolls were rumored to be over thrice poppyseed acre furlongs in all) went a little something like this:

E for excellence and emeralds

M for his majesty

P for power, o preponderant power

E once again for good measure, for eternal everlasting

R for resplendent reverence

O for ostentatious opulence

R for refulgence

That is the way The Emperor lives, that is the way The Emperor is.

            The Emperor would never dare venture out of the example set by his past elders. He took from them his temperament, outlook, and politics. If The Emperor’s monarchy was not just that and actually featured “parties,” as they are called hypothetically called by treasonous philosophers, it can be reasonably surmised that he would have adopted such identifications transmitted [DP1] by his family, too.

            Ruling his kingdom as any other Emperor would, telling this peasant he cannot dig a well there and that peon she cannot trade her rhubarbs with neighboring provinces hither, and signing this decree and that while polishing his sapphire scepter with his unicorn hair silk handkerchief, nothing really ever crossed his mind. He was an Emperor, from a valorous line of Emperors before him, whose job it was to rule. Why should he think more deeply into it? As a mere scribe I dare not journey into such blasphemous territory; yet, for the sake of this historical tale, the question has relevance.

            During the biweekly Emperor Extravaganza day, laborers of the kingdom were granted the evening off to gather at the town square in admiration of The Emperor. His Most Highness, his chin nearly touching his nose as it protruded past the highest turret of the castle, paraded past upon his lavish float as the people were required to gently toss magenta daffodils (the favorite of his most Excellency) at his procession of pageantry. It was a great surprise indeed when the lions pulling his chassis stopped suddenly: a small boy had wandered out of the masses, curiously staring at The Emperor. Shifting his crown back atop his holy head after being discombobulated from the sudden brake, The Emperor looked down upon the small subject between squinted beady eyes, nostrils flaring.

“Guards! Please remove this hindrance from my sight at once,” his highness bellowed.

As the royal guards approached the little boy, he flipped up into the air the small, tattered kite he was holding in his dirty, calloused palm. A dainty breeze caught the kite, and it gingerly floated down into The Emperor’s lap.

“Would you like to go down to Andovershire glen and fly kites with me?” the small child inquired to The Emperor.

The Emperor, visibly bamboozled by such an inquiry, retorted, “No, I would most certainly not.”

“Why not?” the little boy asked politely. “Don’t you like flying kites? It’s a perfect kite-flying day out.”

Staring into the little boy’s bright blue eyes and kind face, The Emperor started to stammer, struggling to articulate why it was he couldn’t do things with his fellow citizens.

“My father and I are going fishing later too, would you like to come along? I heard there’s a giant purple platypus in the lake. I’m gonna catch him.”

The eyes of the kingdom were upon The Emperor. They all knew quite well what was unfolding before him. No one had ever had the effrontery to emerge from the masses and question his position over them, and ask him to consider things a different way, that they were all members of the same community, and could coexist happily and equally with one another. The little boy was too young to be aware of such social grace.

A great debate was unfolding in The Emperor’s head. He could not figure out how to explain to the boy that he ruled him and his family and friends. It was his job to tell the boy’s family what to do, when to do it, and how to do it, just as his family had done for generations. If The Emperor started flying kites with the proletariat philistines, how in the world would they still respect him?

“Why am I even contemplating flying kites at all?” The Emperor thought. “There is no kite flying for Emperors.” However the thought would not leave him.

“Because…it’s just how things work- there is no such time for…it is my job to-” The Emperor stopped suddenly.

“You know what, I’d love to fly kites with you today on this most glorious summer evening,” The Emperor declared, sending the crowd into jovial uproar.

The Emperor hopped down off his caravan without the assistance of his servants, picked up the boy in his arms and placed his crown upon the boy’s head, which fell down over his shoulders. They proceeded down the winding path through the hills, above which fireflies were lazily floating under the wispy, pastel clouds caressing the setting sun.

            Truly ‘twas a historic day in our fair kingdom. The centuries old practices of The Emperors were finally reexamined. It took the naivety of a small curious boy to inform The Emperor that other viewpoints are indeed out there, to which he responded more humanly than any of his subjects ever fathomed possible. Now if you will please forgive me, I desperately want to drop my quill and join the rest of the town’s revelry down in the meadow.[DP2] 

Bibliography

Andersen, Hans Christian; Tatar, Maria (Ed. and transl.); Allen, Julie K. (Transl.) (2008). The Annotated Hans Christian Andersen. New York and London: W. W. Norton & Company, Inc.

            The short story “The Emperor’s New Clothes” is the fiction piece I am structuring my project on. I am reworking an academic political science research paper into a fairytale. The original tall tale tells the story of a king who is so arrogant and concerned with his self image that he is tricked into thinking his new outfit is invisible to incompetent or lesser people, while in reality he is actually wearing nothing at all. His subjects dare not make mention of the emperor’s nudity, but rather act as if nothing is out of the order. A boy, too young to understand the emperor’s position and the social grace the other subjects are showing, blurts out a procession that he is naked. The emperor is horrified, and vows to change his ways.

            The lesson taught by this story fits nicely with the idea set forth in my essay, that of the concrete belief system that emerges from our parents. Explicating the tale a bit allows me to trace where the emperor gained his demeanor of superiority, and identify why it is so rigid and persistent. Attitudes can be changed by other experiences, however, as illustrated by the little boy who points out a new way of thinking that the emperor decides to adopt.

Baldacci, D. (2007). Simple genius. New York: Warner Books.

I originally sought this source in order to get a grasp of political fiction. I wanted to understand how political topics could be made into a creative and entertaining work. I was inspired by this book to take it one step farther, into a genre that lends itself even more to creativity. It also helped me get an idea of the audience that I would be transitioning into; one that is interested in my original essay (by virtue of the assignment) but willing to explore it through a different medium.

Hyman, Herbert H. Political Socialization: A Study in the Psychology of Political Behavior. Glencoe: The Free Press, 1959. Print.

 

Hyman’s book serves as the major foundations for the main argument of this essay, which I am creatively repurposing. Herbert Hyman found in Political Socialization that individuals learn their patterns of political participation early, first and foremost from the family (Hyman, 69). The author’s studies revealed that when children and their parents are measured independently with established agreements in political view, the inference that the family transmits politics to the children is empirically supported. Moreover, Hyman found that “parents are the agents who transmit politically relevant attitudes to their children” (Hyman, 72). Compiling twelve different studies of the agreement of politically relevant views among parents and children, Hyman concluded with certainty that children primarily adopt the political preferences of their parents.

 

I am using this piece as the bedrock of my project to demonstrate to the reader that most research says that party affiliations and belief systems originate at home from parental influence. Because the research I did for my essay from other authors showed that these attitudes tend to persist throughout the life cycle, I may need to find other scholarly evidence for the ability of opinions to change, as the emperor’s did when he encountered the little boy. However, I think it is most important that my adaptation makes most clear Hyman’s idea of the origination of allegiances.


 [DP1]As per Converse and Hyman, most people’s political preferences originate from parental influence. The tale centers around the Emperor’s realization that he can be influenced by others too; the long-standing belief system he was indoctrinated with can be altered by the people he encounters. I think this much is clear. However, my original research didn’t find that such views are susceptible to change. Does this detract from my fairy tale? Do I need to find sources that say people’s opinions can be altered by experiences?

 [DP2]What are your thoughts on length? In terms of the fairy tale genre, I think being brief and sort of wispy with details give it more of a fairy tale feel. I don’t think it would be a good idea to go really in depth with the story, I feel it would lose its creative value.

 Christopher J. Thomas

5 March 2012

Writing 200

Project 2 Draft 3

 

Once upon a time…

            there was an Emperor from a far away land who ruled His people with excessive arrogance and pomposity, never passing up an opportunity to display His superior stature to His subjects. Coming from a long line of Emperors before Him, it was all he knew; The Emperor was the highest, most heralded figure in all the land, just as His great, great, great grandfather was all those eons ago during the Nineteen Years’ Skirmish of South Shirdenhiregarten.

            The Emperor seamlessly followed in the footsteps of the ruby-clad slippers of His forefathers. Not only was such a life outlook all He knew, but the castle in which His family ensconced itself throughout the centuries was festooned with their paintings and tomes of their personal accords, opinions, and advice. The family crest was emblazoned on everything The Emperor owned from His flowing robes and bath robes even to the suede case that contained the alabaster toe nail clipper with which his servants groomed him every Wednesday. He recited the family credo every morning when He awoke, before every address to the public (which were far and few between, mind you), as well as every evening before feasting on olived leg of leopard, The Emperor’s favorite meal and a recipe passed down from generation to generation, upon His mastodon tusk throne. The motto (the non-abridged scrolls were rumored to be over thrice poppyseed acre furlongs in all) went a little something like this:

E for excellence and emeralds

M for His majesty

P for power, o preponderant power

E once again for good measure, for eternal everlasting

R for resplendent reverence

O for ostentatious opulence

R for refulgence

That is the way The Emperor lives, that is the way The Emperor is.

            The Emperor would never dare venture out of the example set by His past elders. He took from them His temperament, outlook, and politics. If The Emperor’s monarchy was not just that and actually featured “parties,” as they are hypothetically proffered by treasonous philosophers, it can be reasonably surmised that he would have adopted such identifications transmitted by his family, too.

            Ruling His kingdom as any other Emperor would, telling this peasant he cannot dig a well there and that peon she cannot trade her rhubarbs with neighboring provinces hither, and signing this decree and that while polishing His sapphire scepter with His unicorn hair silk handkerchief, nothing really ever crossed His sacred cerebellum. He was an Emperor, from a valorous line of Emperors before Him, whose job it was to rule. Why should He think more deeply into it? As a mere scribe I dare not journey into such blasphemous territory; yet, for the sake of this historical tale, the question has relevance.

            During the biweekly Emperor Extravaganza day, laborers of the kingdom were granted the evening off to gather at the town square in admiration of The Emperor. His Most Highness, His chin protruding past the highest turret of the castle, paraded around upon His lavish float as the people were required to gently toss magenta daffodils (the favorite of His most Excellency) at His procession of pageantry. It was a great surprise indeed when the lions pulling his chassis stopped suddenly: a small boy had wandered out of the masses, curiously staring at The Emperor. Shifting His crown back atop His holy head after being discombobulated from the sudden brake, The Emperor looked down upon the small subject with squinted, beady eyes, nostrils flaring.

“Guards! Please remove this hindrance from my sight at once,” His highness bellowed.

As the royal guards approached the little boy, he flipped up into the air the small, tattered kite he was holding in his dirty, calloused palm. A dainty breeze caught the kite, and it gingerly floated down onto The Emperor’s lap.

“Would you like to go down to Andovershire glen and fly kites with me?” the small child inquired to The Emperor.

The Emperor, visibly bamboozled by such an inquiry, retorted, “No, I would most certainly not.”

“Why not?” the little boy asked politely. “Don’t you like flying kites? It’s a perfect kite-flying day out.”

Staring into the little boy’s bright blue eyes and kind face, The Emperor started to stammer, struggling to articulate why it was He couldn’t do things with His fellow citizens.

“My father and I are going fishing later too, would you like to come along? I heard there’s a giant purple platypus in the lake. I’m going to catch him.”

The eyes of the kingdom were upon The Emperor. They all knew quite well what was unfolding before Him. No one had ever had the effrontery to emerge from the masses and question His position over them, and ask Him to consider things a different way, that they were all members of the same community, and could coexist happily and equally with one another. The little boy was too young to be aware of such social grace.

A great debate was unfolding in The Emperor’s head. He could not figure out how to explain to the boy that He ruled him and his family and friends. It was His job to tell the boy’s family what to do, when to do it, and how to do it, just as His family had done for generations. If The Emperor started flying kites with the proletariat philistines, how in the world would they still respect Him?

“Why am I even contemplating flying kites at all?” The Emperor contemplated. “There is no kite flying for Emperors.” However the thought would not leave Him.

“Because…it’s just how things work- there is no time for such…it is my job to-” The Emperor stopped suddenly, the entire citadel anticipating His next words.

“You know what, I’d love to fly kites with you today on this most glorious summer evening,” the Emperor declared, sending the crowd into jovial uproar.

The Emperor hopped down off his caravan without the assistance of his servants, picked up the boy in his arms and placed his crown upon the boy’s head, which rested upon his shoulders. They proceeded with their fellow townspeople down the winding path through the hills, above which fireflies were lazily floating under the wispy, pastel clouds caressing the setting sun.

            Truly ‘twas a historic day in our fair kingdom. The centuries old practices of the Emperors were finally reexamined. It took the naivety of a small, curious boy to inform the Emperor that other viewpoints are indeed out there, that other ways to carry oneself in relation to one’s counterparts do exist. He responded more humanly than any of his subjects ever fathomed possible. From that day henceforth the Emperor decided to cease his excessive hubris and vanity in order to better carry out his duty as a leader; that of which, to serve his people. Now if you will please forgive me, I desperately want to drop my quipping quill and join the rest of the town’s revelry down in the meadow.

Bibliography

Andersen, Hans Christian; Tatar, Maria (Ed. and transl.); Allen, Julie K. (Transl.) (2008). The Annotated Hans Christian Andersen. New York and London: W. W. Norton & Company, Inc.

            The short story “The Emperor’s New Clothes” is the fiction piece I am structuring my project on. I am reworking an academic political science research paper into a fairytale. The original tall tale tells the story of a king who is so arrogant and concerned with his self image that he is tricked into thinking his new outfit is invisible to incompetent or lesser people, while in reality he is actually wearing nothing at all. His subjects dare not make mention of the emperor’s nudity, but rather act as if nothing is out of the order. A boy, too young to understand the emperor’s position and the social grace the other subjects are showing, blurts out a procession that he is naked. The emperor is horrified, and vows to change his ways.

            The lesson taught by this story fits nicely with the idea set forth in my essay, that of the concrete belief system that emerges from our parents. Explicating the tale a bit allows me to trace where the emperor gained his demeanor of superiority, and identify why it is so rigid and persistent. Attitudes can be changed by other experiences, however, as illustrated by the little boy who points out a new way of thinking that the emperor decides to adopt.

Baldacci, D. (2007). Simple genius. New York: Warner Books.

I originally sought this source in order to get a grasp of political fiction. I wanted to understand how political topics could be made into a creative and entertaining work. I was inspired by this book to take it one step farther, into a genre that lends itself even more to creativity. It also helped me get an idea of the audience that I would be transitioning into; one that is interested in my original essay (by virtue of the assignment) but willing to explore it through a different medium.

Hyman, Herbert H. Political Socialization: A Study in the Psychology of Political Behavior. Glencoe: The Free Press, 1959. Print.

Hyman’s book serves as the major foundations for the main argument of this essay, which I am creatively repurposing. Herbert Hyman found in Political Socialization that individuals learn their patterns of political participation early, first and foremost from the family (Hyman, 69). The author’s studies revealed that when children and their parents are measured independently with established agreements in political view, the inference that the family transmits politics to the children is empirically supported. Moreover, Hyman found that “parents are the agents who transmit politically relevant attitudes to their children” (Hyman, 72). Compiling twelve different studies of the agreement of politically relevant views among parents and children, Hyman concluded with certainty that children primarily adopt the political preferences of their parents.

I am using this piece as the bedrock of my project to demonstrate to the reader that most research says that party affiliations and belief systems originate at home from parental influence. Because the research I did for my essay from other authors showed that these attitudes tend to persist throughout the life cycle, I may need to find other scholarly evidence for the ability of opinions to change, as the emperor’s did when he encountered the little boy. However, I think it is most important that my adaptation makes most clear Hyman’s idea of the origination of allegiances.

 

 

 

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  1. The long and winding road I took to creating my second essay, re-purposing an argument, is included in this section. It is a helpful exercise for all writers to examine their work and the transitions they took it over the revision process. My essay started with a bare-bone sketch, then two more drafts took it to its final form.

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